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FDA Certified Clinical Digital Infrared No-Touch Human Thermometer
FDA Certified Clinical Digital Infrared No-Touch Human Thermometer
FDA Certified Clinical Digital Infrared No-Touch Human Thermometer
FDA Certified Clinical Digital Infrared No-Touch Human Thermometer
FDA Certified Clinical Digital Infrared No-Touch Human Thermometer
FDA Certified Clinical Digital Infrared No-Touch Human Thermometer
FDA Certified Clinical Digital Infrared No-Touch Human Thermometer
FDA Certified Clinical Digital Infrared No-Touch Human Thermometer
FDA Certified Clinical Digital Infrared No-Touch Human Thermometer
FDA Certified Clinical Digital Infrared No-Touch Human Thermometer

FDA Certified Clinical Digital Infrared No-Touch Human Thermometer

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FDA Approved Clinical Forehead Thermometer 672264067213
FDA Registration Number: 3002944159  (FQZ)

Features:

  • Non - Contact Clinical Forehead Thermometer
  • FDA Approved Thermometer
  • TSI Supercool is an FDA Registered Supplier
  • Measures Temperature in Fahrenheit & Celsius
  • Measurement Accuracy: +/- 0.2 F/C
  • Temperature Range:  95 - 108 F / 34.0 - 42.2 C
  • Measurement Time: Less than 1 second
  • Measurement Interval Time: Less Than 10 seconds
  • Automatic Shutdown: 1 minute
  • Stores Previous Temperature Readings
  • Requires 2 AAA Batteries (not included)
  • One Year Warranty Under Normal Use
  • The Color changes of the LED are at 99.5 F (37.5 C) BLUE, and 100.76 F (38.2 C) RED.

Working Conditions:

  • Ambient Temperature: 50 - 104 Degrees Fahrenheit
  • Relative Humidity: Less than 85%
  • Store in Cool Dry Place


Benefits of Non-Contact Thermometer:

  • Non-contact approach may reduce the risk of spreading disease between people being evaluated
  • Easy to use
  • Easy to clean and disinfect
  • Measures temperature and displays a reading rapidly
  • Provides ability to retake a temperature quickly

    Non-contact Infrared Thermometers

    Measuring a person’s temperature can be done in several ways. One method to measure a person’s surface temperature is with the use of non-contact infrared thermometers (NCITs). NCITs may be used to reduce cross-contamination risk and minimize the risk of spreading disease. While typically 98.6°F (37.0°C) is considered a “normal” temperature, some studies have shown that "normal" body temperature can be within a wide range, from 97°F (36.1°C) to 99°F (37.2°C). Before NCITs are used, it is important to understand the benefits, limitations, and proper use of these thermometers. Improper use of NCITs may lead to inaccurate measurements of temperature. Note: Forehead temperature typically runs up to 1 degree less than oral temperature.

    Preparing the Environment and NCIT:

    The use environment may impact the performance of the NCIT. Instructions will typically include recommendations for optimal use, such as the following:
    Use in a draft-free space and out of direct sun or near radiant heat sources.
    Determine if conditions are optimal for use. Typically, the environmental temperature should be between 60.8-104 ºF (16-40 ºC) and relative humidity below 85 percent.
    Place the NCIT in the testing environment or room for 10-30 minutes prior to use to allow the NCIT to adjust to the environment.

    Cleaning Between Uses:

    For cleaning NCITs between uses, follow the instructions in the Cleaning and Disinfecting section of the product instructions. Most NCITs should never be immersed in water or other liquids.

    Preparing the Person being Evaluated:

    In preparation for taking a temperature measurement with an NCIT, the person using the NCIT should typically ensure that the test area of the forehead is clean, dry and not blocked during measurement. The person’s body temperature or temperature at the forehead test area has not been increased or decreased by wearing excessive clothing or head covers (for example headbands, bandanas), or by using facial cleansing products (for example cosmetic wipes).

    Using the NCIT:

    Hold the NCIT sensing area perpendicular to the forehead and instruct the person to remain stationary during measurement(s). The distance between the NCIT and forehead is specific to each NCIT. Consult the manufacturer’s instructions for correct measurement distances. Do not touch the sensing area of the NCIT and keep the sensor clean and dry.

    Fever Temperatures: Accuracy and Comparison:

    You can take a temperature using the mouth (oral), anus (rectal), armpit (axillary), or ear (tympanic). But the temperature readings vary depending on which one you use, and you need an accurate body temperature to determine if a fever is present.

    Medical research hasn't determined an exact correlation between oral, rectal, ear, armpit, and forehead temperature measurements. Generally, the correlation of temperature results are as follows:

    • The average normal oral temperature is 98.6°F (37°C).
    • A rectal temperature is 0.5°F (0.3°C) to 1°F (0.6°C) higher than an oral temperature.
    • An ear (tympanic) temperature is 0.5°F (0.3°C) to 1°F (0.6°C) higher than an oral temperature.
    • An armpit (axillary) temperature is usually 0.5°F (0.3°C) to 1°F (0.6°C) lower than an oral temperature.
    • A forehead (temporal) scanner is usually 0.5°F (0.3°C) to 1°F (0.6°C) lower than an oral temperature.

    It is important to remember:

    • Rectal temperatures are generally thought to be the most accurate for checking a young child's temperature.
    • The manufacturer of the temperature device you use, such as an ear or forehead thermometer, provides information on how to use it. Be sure to read and follow the instructions to obtain an accurate temperature. The information may also include how the results of the device correlate with the results from other methods of taking a temperature.
    • Plastic strip thermometers have some uses, but they aren't recommended for general home use. Unlike oral, rectal, and ear thermometers, plastic strip thermometers measure skin temperature, not body temperature.

    When you talk with your doctor about your temperature, be sure to say what method was used to take the temperature.

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